Bubble Topia

In this exercise, participants must pop the bubbles on the screen that correspond with positive emotions. The exercise is designed to increase responses to positive information while minimizing responses to negative information. In the real world, recognizing the positives helps people overcome stress, and lead happier lives

Science Summary

Positive feelings have a contagious effect, enhancing the wellbeing of yourself and those around you. Negative feelings have a similar contagious effect and can spread worry and stress if they persist.

Optimizing positive feelings and mastering stress is associated with the ability to respond rapidly to positive information, and ignore the negative. When feeling stressed and down, responses to this positive information are slowed, and the negative information stands out. This has been referred to as a "mood congruent bias" (1,2). It has been linked to systems involving the frontal brain regions (3).

  1. Erickson K et al.. (2005). American Journal of Psychiatry, 162, 2171-2173.

  2. Murphy FC et al. (1999). Psychological Medicine, 29, 1307–1321

  3. Elliott R et al. (2002). Archives of General Psychiatry, 2002, 597-604.

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Bubble Topia

In this exercise, participants must pop the bubbles on the screen that correspond with positive emotions. The exercise is designed to increase responses to positive information while minimizing responses to negative information. In the real world, recognizing the positives helps people overcome stress, and lead happier lives

Science Summary

Positive feelings have a contagious effect, enhancing the wellbeing of yourself and those around you. Negative feelings have a similar contagious effect and can spread worry and stress if they persist.

Optimizing positive feelings and mastering stress is associated with the ability to respond rapidly to positive information, and ignore the negative. When feeling stressed and down, responses to this positive information are slowed, and the negative information stands out. This has been referred to as a "mood congruent bias" (1,2). It has been linked to systems involving the frontal brain regions (3).

  1. Erickson K et al.. (2005). American Journal of Psychiatry, 162, 2171-2173.

  2. Murphy FC et al. (1999). Psychological Medicine, 29, 1307–1321

  3. Elliott R et al. (2002). Archives of General Psychiatry, 2002, 597-604.